Tips for the Millions of Singles Heading into Retirement Solo

Nearly one-third of Americans ages 45-63 are single and never had children, which means a potential smaller network to help them with the necessary care.  Here are a few tips to assist you facing retirement solo.

Childless retirees will face a slew of additional challenges, and perhaps some advantages.


Without a spouse or children, the odds of becoming isolated (either physically or socially) increase dramatically.  These folks are often called "elder orphans."  You may not think about it this way, but much care for our elders is provided by family members.


Before this goes all negative, I know a great number of childless folks who are living what anybody would describe as dream retirements.  The Healthy, Wealthy and Wise are traveling, spending time with friends, and just enjoying life.  I've even heard the phrase "chosen family" to describe their groups of friends.   Nonetheless, we are all getting a little bit older one day at a time and roughly 70% of people will end up needing Long Term Care, less than half that think they will ever need it according to www.SeniorCare.com.

Here are a few tips to increase your odds to live as independently as possible throughout your retirement:

1.  Plan for a happier and healthier retirement

2.  Make new friends and keep the old

3.  Identify your most trusted friends (your emergency contact)

4.  Right size your housing

5.  Enjoy life